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‘Queen of Hearts’ Wins Best Narrative Feature at the 28th Philadelphia Film Society

THANK YOU FOR ATTENDING THE
28TH PHILADELPHIA FILM FESTIVAL! 

On behalf of the staff at the Philadelphia Film Society we would like to thank everyone that attended the 28th Philadelphia Film Festival!

This year continued the Festival tradition of showcasing local talent and highlighting the best of film from around the world. We hope you found a film that truly inspired, challenged and entertained you over the 11 days.

Thank you again for your support, and see you at the movies!

AWARD WINNERS
Best Documentary Feature
LEFTOVER WOMEN

Best Narrative Feature
QUEEN OF HEARTS

Pinkenson Award for Best Local Feature
CLEMENCY

Archie Award for Best First Feature
ADAM (MOROCCO)

Best Short Film
BROKEN ORCHESTRA

Student Choice Award Winner
THE AUSTRALIAN DREAM

Filmadelphia Audience Award
THE NOMADS

Audience Award (Tie)
KNIVES OUT
COME AS YOU ARE

AWARD SEASON IS COMING!
Walk the red carpet at the Philadelphia Film Center for the 7th Annual Oscars® Party. You’re invited to show off your Hollywood look and celebrate a year in film with the Philadelphia Film Society. Enjoy complimentary food & drink, a silent auction, and the 92nd Academy Awards, live on the biggest screen in Center City.

 

Learn more: http://filmadelphia.org/festival/

 

 

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Queen of Hearts Wins Oscar Submission for Denmark

INDIEWIRE – October 1, 2019 – “Oscars: The Newly-Renamed Best International Feature Film Race Will Offer a Stacked Field of Buzzy Titles” by Anne Thompson.

May el-Toukhy’s Trine Dyrholm-starrer “Queen of Hearts” (Breaking Glass Pictures), which won the Sundance 2019 World Cinema audience award, beat out two finalists for Denmark’s submission.

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Review: In ‘Wobble Palace,’ a Relationship Hangs by a Stringy Toupee – NY Times

Review: In ‘Wobble Palace,’ a Relationship Hangs by a Stringy Toupee – NY Times

It isn’t often that a hairstyle becomes the conduit for a film’s soul. In “Wobble Palace,” a comedy that centers on the trials of try-hard millennials, Eugene (Eugene Kotlyarenko) and Jane (Dasha Nekrasova) are a couple in the death throes of their relationship. They see other people, but they haven’t broken up because neither wants to move out of the apartment they share in downtown Los Angeles — an art-freak crash pad with AstroTurf carpets and curtains printed to look like a crowded Windows desktop, complete with the ubiquitous grassy knoll.

To satisfy their desire for time to themselves, they decide to split the apartment over a weekend. Eugene’s day comes first, and he begins it by swiping through Tinder on the toilet. It would be impossible to miss that Eugene is balding. Around the shiny dome of his forehead, his remaining hair passes his shoulders. By the time Eugene’s date appears for brunch, he has fashioned a hair piece that is as fantastic as it is foolhardy: He wraps his stringy fringe into a bun and fastens it above his bald spot. It’s a style he calls the “floating toupee.”

Read article: http://bit.ly/WobblePalace

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Review: A man traces the life of a son he never knew he had in complex Israeli drama ‘Longing’ – LA Times

Review: A man traces the life of a son he never knew he had in complex Israeli drama ‘Longing’ – LA Times

Writer-director Savi Gabizon’s “Longing” is a gutsy slice of emotional complexity that straddles an intriguing, if not always successful line between the deeply poignant and the darkly absurd.

Out of the blue, Ariel (Shai Avivi), a well-off, middle-aged factory owner, is informed by ex-college girlfriend Ronit (Assi Levy) that he’s the father of her 19-year-old son, Adam, whose existence she had kept secret from Ariel. As if Ariel isn’t shocked enough, Ronit then reveals that Adam was recently killed in a car accident.

Read article: http://bit.ly/LongingLATimes

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Review: Israeli drama ‘Scaffolding’ zeroes in on student’s challenges – LA Times

Review: Israeli drama ‘Scaffolding’ zeroes in on student’s challenges – LA Times

A movie whose title has all kinds of literal and physical meaning to its story, the small-bore Israeli drama “Scaffolding” is about a quick-tempered, disruptive, working-class 17-year-old torn between the challenge of passing high school and his severe father’s desire that he ignore school and take over the family business.

Writer-director Matan Yair was inspired by his own experiences teaching difficult students from homes where education isn’t valued. He even cast one of his former charges, Asher Lax, as the film’s similarly named protagonist, a sensitive hothead who responds positively to the firm but sympathetic attention given to him by his thoughtful literature instructor Rami (Ami Smolartchik), a far cry from how he’s treated at home by his cynical, abusive divorced dad, Milo (a powerful Yaacov Cohen).

Read article: http://bit.ly/ScaffoldingLATimes18

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Q&A on Friday, October 5 with writer/director/star Eugene Koltyarenko, writer/star Dasha Nekrasova – The Metrograph

Q&A on Friday, October 5 with writer/director/star Eugene Koltyarenko, writer/star Dasha Nekrasova – The Metrograph

Q&A on Friday, October 5 with writer/director/star Eugene Koltyarenko, writer/star Dasha Nekrasova, and actor Vishwam Velandy, moderated by Nick Pinkerton

Q&A on Saturday, October 6 with writer/director/star Eugene Koltyarenko, writer/star Dasha Nekrasova, and actor Vishwam Velandy, moderated by Kaitlin Phillips

Featuring Tinder trawling, misfired polyamory, noxious narcissism, real-estate-related romantic contingency, Coachella-themed erotic role play, and cohabitation-as-a-crawling-up-the-walls nightmare, Kotlyarenko’s brazen, squirm-inducing, and deeply hilarious sex comedy has it all, staring unblinking into the abyss of 21st century love. On the rocky fourth year of their romance—and the eve of the 2016 election—couple Eugene and Jane (Kotlyarenko and Dasha Nekrasova, who co-wrote the story) decide to split custody of their Los Angeles home, each using the precious hours of freedom to frantically search for something better than the other. Shot as a funhouse Instagram phantasmagoria by DP Sean Price Williams, the movie’s candy coating and manic timing conceal a core of naked desperation.

Read article: http://bit.ly/MetrographNYCTixWobblePalace

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‘Porcupine Lake’ Trailer: Ingrid Veninger’s TIFF Entry Sensitively Explores Feminine Coming-of-Age – IndieWire

‘Porcupine Lake’ Trailer: Ingrid Veninger’s TIFF Entry Sensitively Explores Feminine Coming-of-Age – IndieWire

The only thing 13-year-old Bea wants in this world is a best friend, and when her lazy summer is interrupted by the introduction of the outspoken Kate, it appears as if she is finally getting her wish. But in lauded Canadian filmmaker Ingrid Veninger’s newest TIFF premiere, “Porcupine Lake,” what initially seems like a fast-moving friendship takes on a new dimension as the pair grow even closer together over the course of one fateful summer.

Born in Bratislava and raised in Canada, Veninger formed pUNK Films in 2003 with a “nothing is impossible” manifesto. In 2014, she initiated the pUNK FILMS FEMMES LAB to foster feature films written and directed by Canadian women, sponsored by Academy Award winner Melissa Leo. “Porcupine Lake” is her sixth feature as writer/director/producer, following her 2015 feature “He Hated Pigeons” and her 2013 TIFF premiere “The Animal Project.”

Long compelled by exploring youth and the heightened emotions that seem to come hand-in-hand with growing up, “Porcupine Lake” looks to fully express Veninger’s vision in a stirring and sensitively told story.

Veninger was driven by big questions when making her film, from “When do we choose the moment to become ourselves?” to “How do young girls explore their identity? Is it by choice? In secret? By trying it out?”

Read article: http://bit.ly/PorcupineLakeIndieWire

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Review: ‘Call Her Ganda’ Explores the Murder of a Transgender Woman – NY Times

Review: ‘Call Her Ganda’ Explores the Murder of a Transgender Woman – NY Times

In October 2014, Joseph Scott Pemberton, an American Marine, took shore leave in Olongapo City, Philippines. There he met Jennifer Laude, a Filipino transgender woman, and went to a hotel room with her. Ms. Laude was later found murdered, and Mr. Pemberton was arrested and charged with the crime.

While the facts were relatively straightforward, the aftermath soon became maddeningly complicated, as seen in “Call Her Ganda,” which followed the resulting trial and the anger it raised in the Philippines.

The documentary, directed by PJ Raval, delves into frictions between the two countries and raises questions over the Visiting Forces Agreement, which protects accused American service personnel and is said to have allowed past crimes to go unpunished. Military influence on the case and widespread transgender discrimination made some Filipinos wary that Ms. Laude’s murder would go unpunished.

Read article: http://bit.ly/CallHerGandaNYTimes

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Review: Thriller ‘Lost Child’ chills to the bone – LA Times

Review: Thriller ‘Lost Child’ chills to the bone – LA Times

A film about a psychically wounded vet reluctantly bonding with a child may sound like something you’ve seen before, but you haven’t seen “Lost Child.” Directed by Ramaa Mosley from a script she wrote with Tim Macy, the slow-burning thriller walks a fine line, balancing elements of psychological drama and the supernatural, with a surging undercurrent of social commentary that sneaks up on you.

Read article: http://bit.ly/LostChildLATimes